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Old Rochester Youth Football and Cheering

Old Rochester Youth Football and Cheering Car Wash

Rochester Youth Football and Cheering

Who doesn’t need their car washed during this dry, dusty summer?   Join Old Rochester Youth Football and Cheering for their Car Wash and Bake Sale on Saturday, (tomorrow), August 20th from 10-2  at the Mattapoisett Fire Department.

The price is $5.00 per car.  Support your local football and cheering team and come on out and get your car sparkling clean and enjoy some goodies.  It’s all for a great cause.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more local news and events.  Our realtors are involved in their communities with their families and are the experts in the neighborhood.

 

Real Estate Market “Blooming”

BOLD Moves Real Estate

The real estate market is “blooming” so to speak or booming as we normally think.  Despite the hot, humid weather and lack of rain, the real estate market is busy.  People are out looking and inventory is low, so houses are moving quickly.

Just like this sunflower beautifully blooming amid a dry, slow garden, your house can look like a standout in the neighborhood.

Consider having your home staged.  Stagers have great ideas to put your home in its best light.  They can give you ideas for projects to do yourself or they can do the staging, even bringing in or removing furniture to give your home a bright, airy feel.  Homes that are staged sell quicker with less days on the market.

On the outside, use your water wisely.  You want your landscaping to stay plush and green and your flowers colorful.  Water in the evening or early morning and consider soaker hoses.  Watering deeply at the roots is what they need.  Sprinklers sometimes can waste water if they are not set properly.  You don’t want to be watering your sidewalk or street.

It’s been a long, hot summer but with a little strategic planning, you can get your house on the market and ready to sell.  It’s a great time since interest rates are still low as well as inventory.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for all your real estate questions.  We offer our talented stager, Laura Severino to get your house market ready.

 

Rochester Country Fair

17th Annual Rochester Country Fair

RochesterCountryFair

The 17th Annual Rochester Country Fair is almost here!  Events start on Thursday, August 18th at 5:00 pm.

Admission is $4.00 on Thursday and $5.00 on Friday, Saturday and Sunday.  Children 5 and under are free.

Visit www.rochesterma.com for more information on upcoming events.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for a great team of experts who are invested in the people in their communities.  They are the local experts to help you buy or sell a home.

video

The Power of Video

 Read this great blog published on Boast
20 OCT 2015
by Kelsey Taber

13 STATS THAT PROVE THE POWER OF VIDEO MARKETING

Video marketing has emerged as a leading way for marketers to influence and engage their target audience. Using video content in your company’s marketing strategy used to be an option. Now its a necessary piece to your marketing puzzle that could make or break the success of your brand. Marketers who use video are more likely to influence their audience in search, on social media, and on their website.

Video Camera

These 13 stats prove the power of video content:

  1. Before reading any text, 60% of site visitors will watch a video if available. (Diode Digital)
  2. One minute of video is worth 1.8 million words. (Forrester Research)
  3. 56% of consumers believe if a company has a website, it should have video content. (Animoto)
  4. The Average user spends 16 minutes and 49 seconds a month watching online video ads. (ComScore)
  5. 80% of consumers say a video showing how a product or service works is important when learning about the company. (Animoto)
  6. Youtube has become the 2nd largest search engine – bigger than Bing, Yahoo, Ask, and AOL combined. (Etail Insights)
  7. Video search results have a 41% higher click-through than plain text results. (Animoto)
  8. 50% of marketers consider customer testimonials, explainer tutorial videos, and demonstration videos the most effective types of video content used. (Asend2)
  9. 4 out of 5 consumers day demo videos are helpful. (Animoto)
  10. Your website is 50 times more likely to appear on the first page of a search engines results page if it includes video. (Forrester Research)
  11. Online video accounts for 50% of mobile traffic, and is predicted to become 75% by 2016. (Cisco)
  12. 63% on consumers say companies who use video know how to reach their consumers. (Animoto)
  13. People stay 2 minutes longer on your site if you have video content. (ComScore)

How do you apply this to your marketing strategy?

  • Add video content to main pages on your website to influence your search results.
  • Use your customers to convey social proof through video testimonials, case studies, and tutorials.
  • Post video content on social media.
  • Keep your videos under 5 minutes long.
  • Spend time making demo videos to convey your product or service’s function and value.
  • Create helpful, non-promotional video content that leaves users turning to you for future information.
  • Short video ads win over display ads.

Your brand should be spending more time on video content, and less time on long-tail written content. As more consumers expect video content to appear with every search they make, you need to be prepared with valuable video content to create a more seamless user experience for your potential customers. The more short videos that can be found either about, or created by your brand, the better luck you have at reaching your audience and becoming an influencer in your industry.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com and see how the power of 3D video can sell your home faster.

landscaping and watering

Landscaping and Watering

landscaping and wateringSummer is an especially important time to save water. Outdoor water use increases residential consumption from 10% to 50% in June, July and August.  This summer has been a particularly difficult year with significantly less than average rainfall and the need to water more frequently.  Every drop counts to keep your landscaping alive and flourishing.

TIMING IS CRITICAL!

Watering your lawn mid-day will result in a high rate of evaporation and sunburned grass. Roots can maintain plenty of moisture even after several days without rain. Before watering, look for signs that it’s needed: patchy areas, a general change in color or footprints that remain in the grass long after being made.

Frequent light watering can actually weaken your lawn by encouraging shallow roots that are less tolerant of dry periods and more susceptible to insect damage. Wet grass can also burn in the hot sun and is vulnerable to disease from mildew and fungus. Test your soil for dryness by digging your finger below the surface of the soil. Water only when the soil is dry to a depth of 1 1/2 inches. When watering, check to see that water soaks down 3-4 inches. This encourages deep root growth.

GIVE YOUR LAWN A REST

If your lawn “fades” in the summer, don’t panic. Grass becomes naturally dormant during hot, dry periods. It will revive quickly after a good rainfall or when the weather turns cooler.

  • Water very early in the morning.
  • Never water when it’s windy, rainy or very hot.
  • Raise the blade level of your mower to 2 -3 inches or more. Longer grass retains more moisture because it shades the roots. It encourages deeper rooting, requires less fertilizer and competes better against weeds.
  • Never water faster than the soil can absorb it. Avoid puddling and run-off.
  • Be sure your hose has a shut-off nozzle. Hoses without a nozzle can spout 10 gallons or more per minute.
  • If you have an automatic sprinkler system, make sure the timer or “controller” is set to water each landscape zone efficiently. Program the controller to operate according to the watering needs of your lawn or garden. Better still, install a rain sensor or soil moisture sensor that turns the system off if it’s raining or if moisture is present in the soil.
  • Do not apply fertilizer in the summer – new growth requires more water. Apply in early spring and or fall.
  • Aerate your soil in April, September or October to aid water absorption and retention.

PLAN AND DESIGN YOUR GARDEN FOR EFFICIENT WATERING

Be aware of the various zones in your yard (hot/sunny, cool/shady, moist, dry, etc.) and plan your gardens and plantings accordingly. For example, if your have a hot, dry zone, carefully select plants that can endure hot, dry conditions.

CLUSTER PLANTS THAT NEED EXTRA CARE

If you choose shrubs, flowers or vegetables that need lots of sun and moisture, place them near each other. You’ll save time and water by watering just one area of your yard.

MULCH TO KEEP ROOTS MOIST

Mulch can serve as a ground cover that reduces water evaporation from the soil and reduces the number of weeds that would otherwise compete with the plant for available soil moisture.

Mulch flowers, shrub beds and trees with pine bark mulch. In your vegetable beds, use salt marsh hay, newspaper (no color pages), black plastic, or better yet, landscape fabric – that allows water to penetrate the fabric but keeps down weed growth. On a sweltering 100° day, a 3-inch mulch can keep the soil underneath up to 25° cooler! Avoid white marble chips that can damage acid-loving plants like rhododendrons. Stones or pebbles are good on shady areas. They shouldn’t be used near the house because they give off too much heat. Ground covers, such as ivy or pachysandra, also prevent evaporation around established shrubs and ornamental trees

.You can’t control the weather but you can do  your part to make the most of the water available to help keep your  landscaping alive.

Visit www.agentrising.com for more useful tips to pass on to your real estate clients or to start your real estate career with Agent Rising Real Estate School.

This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on August 12, 2016.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com  for great real estate in your community.

Pan-Mass Challenge

Rochester Party Celebrates Pan-Mass Riders

Rochester party celebrates Pan-Mass riders

By Georgia Sparling | Aug 06, 2016
Sippican Week

Photo by: Georgia SparlingDebbie Bacchiocchi arrives at her house where a cheering party is underway.

ROCHESTER — Some may disagree, but according to one member of the Bacchiocchi cheering party, it’s the “number one Pan-Mass Challenge Party in Rochester!”

More than 50 people converged at the Bacchiocchis’ Walnut Plain Road home on Saturday for a cookout and to cheer on riders taking the two-day, 192-mile route of the PMC, an event that raises millions each year for Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

The group wasn’t just hooting and hollering for the masses cycling past, but also for one of their own.

Debbie Bacchiocchi, a kindergarten teacher at Rochester Memorial School, has participated in the ride for nine years.

“She trains year-long,” said her husband and the host of the party, Billy Bacchiocchi.

He said his wife was inspired to join the PMC after having a few “close scares” with cancer and losing two family members to the disease. She also has a brother currently fighting cancer.

While friends, family and co-workers waited for Debbie to arrive, neighbor Mark Collins helped to keep the crowd lively.

“I seem to be taking the head cheerleader [job],” he said.

Collins, who often thanked the riders as they passed, said the PMC is a “very, very worthwhile cause, one of the best ever.”

The annual party isn’t too bad either.

“For a small town in Rochester, we’ve got a pretty good party,” said Collins.

One rider who paused at the Bacchiocchis’ house said she appreciates all the people who cheer along the route.

“It really helps,” said cyclist Pamela Mantas.

When Debbie arrived, she received a hero’s welcome, getting lots of hugs and taking pictures with the partygoers.

“I’m feeling great. I’m feeling awesome,” she said.

Her home is at the 95.3 mile, just shy of the halfway point between Sturbridge to Provincetown.

Bacchiocchi and the other cyclists finished on Sunday.

More than 50 people came to cheer on Bacchiocchi and other cyclists. (Photo by: Georgia Sparling)

Evan and Cole Hemenway wait for their aunt Debbie with mom Beth. (Photo by: Georgia Sparling)

Mark Collins leads the cheering squad. (Photo by: Georgia Sparling)

Debbie Bacchiocchi and fellow cyclists Timothy Rosa talk during their break. (Photo by: Georgia Sparling)

A trio of cyclists pass. (Photo by: Georgia Sparling)

Large groups passed the house from midday to late afternoon. (Photo by: Georgia Sparling)

This rider reaches Rochester earlier than most, cycling along Neck Road before 10 a.m.(Photo by: Georgia Sparling)
Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more local news and local realtors who live and work in your community.
real estate

Trends in the Real Estate Market

10 Trends Driving the Housing Market Now
© Larry Downing / Reuters
By Beth Braverman

real estate
 

April showers bring May home sales? That’s the hope for homeowners listing their properties this year.

Experts think this spring will be busy as a strong job market continues to fuel an already heated housing market. Whether you’re buying or selling this year, here are the trends you need to know about.

1. Homes are getting less affordable.

Home prices are continuing to rise in most parts of the country far faster than wages, making it harder for the average American to afford a home. The average wage earner in the first quarter of this year had to spend more than 30 percent of his income on mortgage payments, up from 26 percent the year before and 22 percent in 2012, according to RealtyTrac. “Buyers are going to have a tougher time than they did last year affording homes because prices have gone up again,” says RealtyTrac Vice President Daren Blomquist.

Despite the higher prices, buying a home looks more attractive when compared to the cost of renting today. Rents have gotten so high that buyers will save money compared to renting within two years of purchasing a property in 70 percent of U.S. housing markets, according to Zillow.

2. Mortgages are getting (slightly) easier to get.

The days of crazy, strict underwriting standards and low-ball appraisals killing deals seem to have finally passed. More than three quarters of purchase loan applications in March closed, up from just two thirds in 2015, according to Ellie Mae. Thanks to relaxed guidelines from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, lenders are also now able to offer conforming loans to borrowers who haven’t been able to scrape together a 20 percent down payment.

3. Mom-and-pop investors are in (and institutional investors are out).

Large institutional investors, who really drove the market for the past few years, have finally slowed their purchasing, as rising home prices have made the math less appealing. Given the high rents, however, they’re opting to remain as landlords rather than selling their properties just yet. Meanwhile, mom-and-pop investors, many of whom have abandoned the stock market, are also getting into the landlord game, purchasing single-family homes or vacation rentals as investments.

4. You’re less likely to compete with all-cash buyers.

Last year cash buyers accounted for just a third of home sales, the lowest level since 2008, according to a March report from CoreLogic. Cash sales peaked in January 2011, when they made up nearly 47 percent of the market, and they’ve been trending lower since then. CoreLogic projects that cash purchases will fall to 25 percent of sales — their historic average — by the middle of next year.

 

5. Inventory is still really tight.

While rising home values are pushing more sellers to start listing their properties, inventory is still tight, particularly for starter homes. That’s because there are fewer distressed properties coming onto the market for sale. Builders put up about 650,000 new single-family homes last year, the highest number since 2008 but far below the historical average. “We’re just not building enough homes,” says Mark Dotzour, chief economist at Texas A&M’s Real Estate Center. “That industry hasn’t recovered enough to meet demand.”

6. Townhouses are having a moment.

Thanks to an increased demand for new walkable, “urban villages” among both first-time buyers and Boomers looking to downsize, there’s growing demand for high-density housing such as townhouses. The number of townhouses build last year increased 18 percent over 2014, and they now comprise nearly 12 percent of all new home construction, according to the National Association of Home Builders.

7. The prospect of rising rates isn’t spooking buyers.

After years of worries that rising rates would tank the housing markets, the Fed has moved at such a glacial pace that the real estate market has steadied itself and consumers are in a better position to absorb rate increases, especially ones that occur gradually. Rates for a 30-year mortgage are currently at around 3.6 percent, their lowest level in three years. “In most markets, rates would have to double in order to wash out the benefits of home ownership, and that’s just not going to happen anytime soon,” says Trulia Chief Economist Ralph McLaughlin

8. The hottest markets may have peaked.

As we all learned in the housing crisis a decade ago, long-term, double-digit growth in home prices just isn’t sustainable. After several years of such growth, the country’s hottest markets, such as San Francisco and Boston, seem to finally be leveling off. There’s less concern of a bubble this time around, though, since the buyers of homes in those markets either bought their homes with cash or with carefully vetted loans, meaning that a return of mass foreclosure is unlikely.

9. Good homes are going fast.

Nationally, homes are still moving quickly. A new report from Trulia finds that a third of properties sell within 30 days of hitting the market. Starter homes are moving the fastest and seeing the biggest uptick in prices, making it even more difficult for first-time buyers to get a foothold in the market. In March 62 percent of agents who wrote offers say faced bidding wars, according to Redfin.

10. The suburbs are staging a comeback.

The cost of both renting and buying a home in urban centers has gone up so quickly that many buyers are expanding their searches to the ‘burbs. More than half of today’s buyers are looking for a single-family home in the suburbs, according to the Bank of America Homebuyer Insights Report. However, there’s an emphasis on closer-in suburbs with city-like amenities such as downtowns and public transportation. Today’s buyers are willing to sacrifice the size of their home and live in denser communities in order to cut down on commute time.

Visit www.fiscaltimes.com

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more local real estate and your local real estate professionals.

 

fresh air fund

Fresh Air Fund in the Tri-town

Fresh Air Fund gets children out of the city, into the tri-town

By Tanner Harding | Jul 24, 2016
fresh air fund

Photo: Tanner HardingTracy Fiore, Ella and Lilah Gendrea, Faust Fiore and Ella in front enjoy the Harbor Days festivities in Mattapoisett.

MATTAPOISETT — Many people remember spending the summers of their childhood playing outside with their friends or swimming in the pool in their backyard. But in cities like New York, many children don’t get the opportunities to enjoy their summer vacation in those ways.

However, since 1877 the nonprofit organization Fresh Air Fund has been working to get kids out of busy cities during the summer months. The Fresh Air Fund was created to get inner city children from New York out of the hot city and into fresh air, particularly children hit by the tuberculosis epidemic, as fresh air was seen as a cure for respiratory diseases.

Today, families throughout the East Coast and southern Canada continue to host inner city children ages 7 to 18 for a week or two during the summer. In Mattapoisett, Tracy Fiore and her family are hosing Ella, a 7-year-old from New York City, for the second summer in a row.

“She’s a very bright little girl, very inquisitive, she loves doing anything,” Fiore said.

Ella was a bit shy around this reporter, but it was clear that she’s enjoying her time outside of the big city.

One of the goals of the organization is to expose the children to things that they wouldn’t necessarily get to experience in a city environment.

“[We do] things like walking barefoot on the grass, feeding the birds,” Fiore said. “I have chickens, so we check for eggs.”

Despite Ella’s young age, Fiore said she handles being away from her family well.

“She’s really brave and independent,” she said. “She’s very well behaved, very smart, very helpful.”

Parents hear about the program through television advertisements and can sign up through social service agencies or churches, and the children are then paired with a host family in a more suburban or rural area.

Fiore said she knows of families in Dartmouth and Rochester as well who are doing the program. Many people are like her, and host the same children multiple years in a row.

“When I picked Ella up,” Fiore recalled, “there were people with signs that said ‘welcome back…for the fifth summer.’”

Families interested in hosting a child next year can visit www.freshair.org to learn more.

Read about more great local stories at  www.sippican.villagesoup.com

Check out www.boldmovesrealestate.com for local real estate and a great team of real estate professionals in your community.

boldmoves2013logo_trans1

Gypsy Moths Invade the Tri-Town

Gypsy moths invade tri-town

By Tanner Harding and Douglas McCulloch | Jul 20, 2016

Courtesy of: Konrad Lackerbeck

The moths are everywhere. Fluttering around trees in your backyard. Flying into your windshield. Beating on the back door. But the big problem, experts say, is likely yet to come.

The fluttering horde is made up of gypsy moths, newly hatched from what is being described as the worst outbreak of the leaf-eating caterpillars since 1981.

Now, emerged from their cocoons, the moths are looking for mates and laying eggs – so that even more little worms can chomp on your trees next year.

The moths begin their lives as larvae, according to the University of Massachusetts Amherst Center for Agriculture, Food, and the Environment. A female gypsy moth typically lays about 600 eggs at a time, and the eggs usually hatch in early May.

The larvae complete several moults, then pupate toward the end of June. They emerge two weeks later as adult moths. The gypsy moth mating season usually continues until late July to early August.

The main reason for the severe outbreak this year is a lack of rain, causing the biggest gypsy moth outbreak since 1981, according to University of Massachusetts Amherst entomology professor Joseph Elkinton.

Gypsy moths are not indigenous to North America, and were brought here by a French scientist in 1869. The moths escaped from a laboratory in Medford and have been causing trouble ever since. While most insects play a vital role in our ecosystem, the gypsy moth has no ecological benefit. They’re strictly pests, according to Mattapoisett Tree Committee Chair Sandy Hering.

“Gypsy moths have been a real problem in various spots in the state,” she said. “I would say here on the South Coast we have pockets that are very bad.”

And residents have taken notice.

“The Tree Committee hasn’t received any specific complaints about it,” Hering said. “But at Harbor Days I heard people complaining about them flying around.”

While Mattapoisett hasn’t had any official complaints, Marion Tree Committee Chair Margie Baldwin said she had.

“I’ve had a few calls,” Baldwin said.

At Marion’s Fall Town Meeting, voters approved spending $10,000 in the event the Tree Committee needed to spray trees to kill larvae. However, according to Baldwin, the committee decided that wasn’t necessary this year.

The one natural enemy of the caterpillars is the fungus entomophaga maimaiga, one that grows naturally and affects the gut of the caterpillars, thus acting like a natural insecticide to control gypsy moth outbreaks.

“We asked for money to monitor the eggs, and it wasn’t as bad as last year,” she said. “But the problem is we haven’t had any rain, so the fungus can’t grow. It could be bad next year.”

According to Hering, the moth outbreaks in the 80s were horrible, but got better as the fungus started to affect them.

“Now, for whatever reason, it has gotten bad again,” she said.

At this point in the season, it’s too late to control the outbreak. Once the caterpillars turn into moths, they stop eating and concentrate on laying eggs, which will hatch in the spring.

“We can’t do anything until next spring when they hatch,” Baldwin said. “You have to exactly monitor the time of it.”

Baldwin anticipates that the committee will again ask for money in case it needs to spray the trees to combat the moths come spring.

There are several options for homeowners to protect their shade trees from gypsy moths.

Elkinton recommends hiring a professional to apply pesticides to trees in early May just before eggs begin to hatch. It can be pricey, however.

“It’s expensive, but so is cutting down a dead tree,” Elkinton said.

Experts recommend inspecting trees for signs of gypsy moth egg masses during the fall and winter and removing them.

Officials in Rochester could not be reached in time for printing.

Visit www.sippican.villagesoup.com for more local news and stories.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more local news.  Our agents are the local experts and live and work in the communities they serve.

BOLDIES

BOLD Moves Real Estate Celebrates 10th Year Anniversary

BOLDIES

BOLD Moves Real Estate celebrated their 10th Year Anniversary this month with a wonderful party for all the BOLDIES and their families hosted by Michelle Saltmarsh at her beautiful home in Mattapoisett.  Broker/owner Kate Lanagan MacGregor stated two main reasons for their success.  Professionally, she credits a deep commitment to excellence.  Personally, she shared that BOLD Moves Associates, affectionately called BOLDIES, are like a tribe, protecting one another and supporting the common goals.  With almost no turnover, she believes the culture of   ‘loving what you do’ and associates’ encouragement for their own authentic branding are the strategic differentiators of BOLD Moves Real Estate!  Each BOLDIE knows they are not alone in their career.  Everyone looks out for one another and has ‘each other’s back’.  There is nothing this tribe cannot accomplish together.

Visit our website at www.boldmovesrealestate.com and learn more about what makes BOLD Moves Real Estate BOLD!   Meet the team of BOLDIES and see how they can help you with your real estate needs.