Old Rochester Regional High School Football

Old Rochester Regional High School Homecoming

Lady BulldogsAccording to Sippican Weekly:

Big game, new mascot waiting at ORR Homecoming

Oct 16, 2017

MATTAPOISETT — Old Rochester Regional High School’s football team will face off against Seekonk at the school’s homecoming game, but there’s a lot of school spirit beforehand.

The high school’s annual pep rally will see each class face off by performing a homecoming skit on Friday, Oct. 19. The most creative skit will win; past classes have performed “The Chronicles of Narnia,” “Star Wars,” “Napoleon Dynamite,” “Elf” and “Monsters, Inc.”

The homecoming football game will begin at 7 p.m. on the same day. The Bulldogs have won their last three homecoming games, defeating Apponequet in 2016, this year’s foe Seekonk in 2015, and Wareham in 2014.

During half-time, high school principal Mike Devoll has said that ORR’s new official mascot will be revealed; earlier in the year, an online questionnaire was offered to tri-town residents, looking for their input in what they wanted in a mascot.

“We had so many different bulldog mascots,” Devoll said at the time. “For unity’s sake, it would be nice to have just one mascot.”

With the help of a New Bedford graphic design company, the new bulldog mascot is just waiting to be revealed on Friday night.

Homecoming weekend will be capped by the school’s homecoming dance, which will run on Saturday, Oct. 20, from 7-10 p.m. at the high school.

Visit sippican.villagesoup.com for more local stories of the neighborhoods we live and work in.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com  for a great team of realtors who are experts in the neighborhoods they live and work in.

This blog was posted on www.bbmpros.com on October 18, 2017.

fall curb appeal

Fall Curb Appeal

Fall curb appealAccording to HGTV, here are some tips to enhance your curb appeal this fall, and get your house sold.

Spruce Up Your Lawn

While brilliant fall foliage can automatically make your home look more attractive for showings, that doesn’t mean you can slack off on lawn maintenance during this season. Keep falling leaves at bay with frequent raking and patch up any brown spots in the grass.

Plant Fall Flowers

Once your lawn is looking its best, spice it up with a splash of color. As your summer plants start to fade, replace them with vibrant mums or other colorful flowers.

Highlight Your Front Door

Making your front door the focal point of your home’s exterior is a good tactic no matter what time of year you decide to sell your home. During the fall, a simple wreath of fall foliage and flowers can add an inviting touch. A fresh coat of paint in a vivid red can also make your entrance stand out.

Clean Up the Exterior

When fall rolls around and the trees shed their leaves, your home becomes more exposed, making its exterior appearance extra important. Before putting your home on the market, pressure wash the exterior and clean the windows. If the paint is chipped or faded, applying a fresh coat will do wonders to revive your home’s appearance.

Clear Out All Gutters

Staying on top of yearly and monthly maintenance lets buyers know you care about your home’s upkeep. During the fall, be sure to clear your gutters and downspouts of leaves and other debris, which will protect your home from water damage.

Add Outdoor Lighting

As the days get shorter, it becomes increasingly important to provide potential homebuyers with a safe path to your front door. Use decorative lights to illuminate walkways, and install flood lights or lanterns to brighten up entrance areas.

Keep Decorations Simple

While subtle fall decor – a wreath on the door or pots of seasonal flowers – will make your home look inviting and fresh, going overboard will distract buyers from your home itself. Save your scarecrows and spooky Halloween decorations for another year.
Visit www.hgtv.com for more ideas to make your home pop.
Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for local agents who live and work in the communities they serve.  Let them help you with all your real estate needs.
This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on October 5, 2017.
Kat Moulton

Kat Moulton is New Scholarshare Winner at Agent Rising

Kat Moulton

 Agent Rising Real Estate School is proud to announce that Kat Moulton  is their Second Scholarshare winner.

Agent Rising Real Estate School  SOAR program has decided to Pay it Forward and Give away a free Online Real Estate course to a deserving student each month.  The deadline for the applications is the 15th of each month and the winner will be announced at the beginning of the next month.

This month out of 15+ applications, Kat Moulton of Stow, MA was chosen as the newest Scholarshare winner.  Kat will embark on her real estate career by taking the online real estate course at Agent Rising tuition-free.

Kat sent her story to Agent Rising Real Estate School.  Kat is a 48-year old mother of three children, ages 12-almost 16.  She has enjoyed taking care of her family and working part-time over the years and recently has been involved in online coaching and a part-time sales position.

Unfortunately, she has had some family misfortunes recently and is ready to take on a new career to help her family situation.  She has always been interested in real estate and helping people.  Taking the real estate course online will give her the tools to make this happen.  She loves the flexibility this career will allow her as well as the financial opportunities and the ability to help people find their home or sanctuary.

Visit www.agentrising.com and click on the Scholarshare link to tell your story and apply for a free online real estate course.  You can also check out all the real estate tips and information the website has to offer to help you SOAR with your real estate career.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for all the real estate news and a great team of realtors ready to help you with all your real estate needs.

This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on September 28, 2017.

runners

Old Rochester Regional High School Runners

Old Rochester cross-country runners rise to college levels

By Andrea Ray | Sep 21, 2017

Courtesy of: Assumption College Athletics
Former Old Rochester cross-country runner Nina Bourgeois of Rochester (front) now runs for Trinity College.

MATTAPOISETT — It’s 2:30 p.m. on a Thursday, and in Washburn Park, a student goes zooming by.

He’s followed by another, then a gaggle of girls, chatting as they run. Slowly, the entire group of 52 students forms a long line of runners circling the park’s grounds.

With any luck, at least a few of them will continue their run—right onto college teams. The Old Rochester Regional High School cross-country teams, both girls and boys, have produced a number of college runners recently.

Cindy Tilden, the coach of the girls’ cross country team, named three college runners from just the Old Rochester Class of 2017. Recent graduate Riley Shaughnessy now runs for Worcester State. Nina Bourgeois and Rachel Scheub of Rochester run for Trinity College.

Getting the students fit for college running is something Cindy and her husband Bill (who is the coach of the boys’ cross-country team) have some experience with. The cross country season only runs for 10 weeks, and doesn’t have a spring season. To top it off, only about half of the students on the teams (the number of overall cross-country runners this year is 52) generally run cross-country before high school.

“Mostly though,” Tilden explained, “they’re students who thought they would give cross-country a try in their sophomore year, or who switched over from another sport.”

Because the team is comprised of students from varying fitness levels, Tilden splits them up into different groups. “Sometimes it feels like I need to be in fifteen places at once,” she joked. “The team covers anyone from people who’ve never run before to people who’ve been running for a long time.”

Team workouts include running, stretching, and cardio and weight routines, tailored to the fitness level of the students performing them.

The students also need to find a way to keep fit in the spring season, particularly if they’re looking to improve on their times. A number of students, Tilden explained, run track in the spring, but the teams also consist of swimmers and basketball players.

The number of students going on to run in college has been rising for the past few years. “For a long time, students thought that they weren’t fast enough for college cross-country, and that they couldn’t compete,” Tilden said. “It’s becoming more common, though.”

Tilden noted that new opportunities are always opening up. “There are higher and lower divisions and more cross-country teams appearing. There are even running clubs, and those clubs still go to meets and compete, like any sports team,” she added.

“There’s always an opportunity for anyone who likes to run.”

Visit www.sippican.villagesoup.com for more local stories of our local athletes.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more local news and local realtors who care and live in the neighborhoods they serve.

This blog was posted on September 26, 2017 on www.bbmpros.com

 

real estate

2018 Real Estate Trends

Agent RisingThe real estate market has been busy this year and a great opportunity for sellers, but what is in the forecast for 2018?

Most early forecasters agree that home prices will continue to rise.  How much will they rise?   There is not a general consensus.  They go anywhere from 3-5%.   Either way, this is good for buyers.  Prices have risen much higher in the past.

Mortgage rate news is not so sunny.  Mortgage rates are expected to rise in 2018, and may hit the 5% benchmark.  Still affordable for some, but could knock some out of the buying pool, especially those with high student debt.

Boomerang buyers could make up for some of these buyers.  Boomerang buyers are those 10 million Americans forced into foreclosure when the housing bubble burst around 2009.  Their 7 year foreclosure period is ending and they are ready to buy again.  A lot of these buyers are looking for low down payment loans, such as FHA.  A lot of these boomerang buyers are in their 50’s and have been renting and are ready to take the plunge again, a little older and wiser.

Land sales are up as well as an increase in home construction.

It looks to be a guarded but prosperous 2018.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more real estate news and a great team of realtors to help you with all your real estate needs.

This blog was posted on www.agentrising.com on September 22, 2018.

Hurricane Jose

Hurricane Jose Threatens Tri-town

Hurricane Jose threatens tri-town

By Tanner Harding | Sep 18, 2017

Courtesy of: NOAAThe yellow areas are under a tropical storm watch.

The tri-town is under tropical storm warning, and residents are urged to take care of their boats and kayaks before the storm hits.

A tropical storm watch means heavy rains and winds from 39-73 miles per hour, so Marion Harbormaster Isaac Perry is making a few preparations and recommendations before it gets here.

“We’re requiring kayaks be removed from the kayak racks,” he said.

The department also requires people with boats docked on the eastern facing wharfs to move their boats to the inside of the harbor.

“That’ll get their sterns out of the wind,” Perry said.

The Harbormaster Department decided not to take its floats out of the water, but does recommend that people take their boats off the floats in front of the Harbormaster office.

Perry said he’s not expecting anything too damaging from the storm, but still wanted to take some precautions.

This story will be updated with more information as it becomes available.

Visit www.sippican.villagesoup.com for more local stories in the tri-town.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more local news and realtors who live and work in your communities.

This blog was posted on www.bbmpros.com on September 19, 2017

fall

Fall Landscaping Tips

fallFall Landscaping Tips according to This Old House

“This is prime time to prep your yard for the next growing season,” says This Old House landscape contractor Roger Cook. Cooling temperatures slow aboveground growth, and moister soil encourages strong root development. Removing spent stems, dead branches, and heavy leaf cover protects plants’ overall health. Read on for Roger’s fall checklist.

Aerate the Lawn

If rainfall pools on the grass, it’s time to aerate compressed soil so water and nutrients can reach the roots. A garden fork can do the job on a small yard, but for larger lawns Roger uses a walk-behind aerator that pulls out 2½-to 3-inch-deep soil plugs, which will break down naturally by spring.

Feed Your Grass

Cutting back on fertilizer in late summer prevents perennials from wasting energy on leaf production. “But grass roots keep growing until the ground gets down to around 40 degrees,” says Roger, “so this is a good time to feed them.” Apply a high-phosphorus (12-25-12) mix to lawns in fall to encourage roots, so turf greens up earlier in spring.

Mow a Final Time

Roger trims turf down to 1¼ inches for the last cut of the season. “Disease has a harder time with shorter grass,” Roger says, “and fallen leaves blow across the lawn because they have nothing to latch on to.” Don’t go too low, though: Grass makes most of its food in the upper blade.

Collect Leaves

To make fallen leaves easier to transport, rake them onto a plastic tarp. Roger adds them (along with leaves he’s cleared from the gutters) to a compost bin—a simple chicken-wire pen will do. Flip the leaf pile every week with a garden fork to aerate; the “black gold” that results next year can nourish lawns, flower beds, and shrub borders.

Plant New Shrubs

In many parts of the country, planting shrubs in early fall gives the plants a head start at establishing roots in the season’s cool, moist soil. The basics: Dig a hole (twice the diameter and to a depth of 2 inches less than the full height of the root ball); position the shrub in the hole (make sure the top of the root ball remains at, not below, ground level); fill in with soil; water to settle soil; add more soil to top of root ball (don’t pack soil down with foot); mulch.

Trim Dead Limbs

Lifeless branches can succumb to winter snow and winds, endangering you and your home. “For big jobs, call in the pros,” says Roger. But you can protect small ornamental trees from further damage by cutting cracked, loose, and diseased limbs close to (but not flush with) the trunk; leave the wounds exposed to heal.

Cut Back Perrenials

A little work now results in healthier spring beds: Evict tired annuals, as well as the snails and slugs that feed on them, which breed in fall. Trim spent perennial foliage down to the ground; this sends energy to the roots, for next season. Every three years, divide crowded tuberous plants, like irises and daylilies: More space means more flowers.

Mulch Young Plants

Give new beds a layer of mulch—chopped leaves, weed-free straw, or wood chips—after a light frost, but before the ground freezes. Till decomposed layers of organic mulch into the soil, then apply a fresh 2- to 4-inch layer (more will smother roots) to keep new plantings warm and to control water runoff and soil erosion.

Dry Out Drip Systems

Standing water can freeze and crack drip-irrigation tubing. For simple systems, Roger shuts the water off, unscrews the tap-joint adapter, and, using a high-volume, low-pressure setting on his compressor, inserts an air hose where the system normally attaches to the tap. “Blowing the water out avoids having to uproot the entire system.”

A little extra time can bed your landscaping down for the winter and make for a better spring.

Visit www.thisoldhouse.com for more great tips to keep your home and yard looking great.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more great tips for your home and a great team of real estate professionals ready to help you with all your real estate needs.

This blog was posted on www.boldmovesrealestate.com on September 14, 2017.

ORR Harry Smith

ORR’s Harry Smith Breaks Touchdown Record in Cranberry Bowl

ORR’s Harry Smith breaks touchdown record in Cranberry Bowl

By Matthew Bernat | Sep 08, 2017

Photo by: Matthew BernatRunning back Harry Smith, center, celebrates with teammates after a 40-41 win on Friday. Smith set a new school record with 34 careers touchdowns.

Old Rochester Regional High School walked away with a thrilling 40-41 win in Friday night’s Cranberry Bowl versus Wareham on its rival’s home turf.

And senior running back Harry Smith left the field after setting a new school record. Smith scored six touchdowns, earning a career total of 34 and beating the previous record of 30. That record was set by Frank Oliva when he played from 1974 to 1976.

“There was a lot of hard work that paid off tonight,” said Smith. “I’m happy to get the record, and I have to give credit to my team, my linemen and my coach.”

Smith and the rest of the Bulldogs celebrated on the field, hoisting the Cranberry Bowl trophy high after a hard fought game that remained close through four quarters.

“That was the best high school football game I’ve been a part of as a player or as a coach,” said Head Coach Justin Kogler.

Kogler said Smith’s athleticism and positive attitude makes him one of the best, if not the best, running backs in the South Coast Conference.

“He’s the hardest working kid I’ve ever coached,” said Kogler.

Friday marked the first game of the season for the Bulldogs. Up next, the team will face Apponequet at Apponequet Regional High School on Sept. 15 at 7 p.m.

Check out more local stories in the tri-town at www.sippican.villagesoup.com

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for your local experts in your neighborhood.  Let us help you navigate the real estate market.  We live and work in the neighborhoods we serve.

This blog was posted on www.bbmpros.com on September 13, 2017.

sports schedules

Local High School Sports Schedules

fall sportsThe kids are  back at school and fall sports has begun.    Field hockey, soccer, volleyball and  football are just some of the fall sports offered at the local high schools.  The teams have already been practicing for a few weeks  and games are starting this week.

Click on the link below for the Fall Sports Schedule at Old Rochester Regional High School.

WWW.SOUTHCOASTCONFERENCE.ORG

Old Colony Vocational Technical High School

http://occougarathletics.com/

Fairhaven High School

http://www.southcoastconference.org/public/genie/567/school/3/

New Bedford High School

http://www.newbedfordschools.org/cms/One.aspx?portalId=67022&pageId=153347

New Bedford Voke

http://www.gnbvt.edu/athletics/fall/fall_index.htm

Dartmouth High School

http://dartmouthps.dhs.schoolfusion.us/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=150847

Wareham High

https://www.warehamps.org/Page/100

Bishop Stang High School

http://www.bishopstang.org/athletics

Come on out and support our young local athletes.  Click on the links below each school to link to their fall sports schedules.

Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for all your local stories.  We have a great team of BOLDIES who are involved and experts in your community and neighborhoods.

This blog was posted on www.bbmpros.com on September 6, 2017.

 

T.U.R.F.

T.U.R.F. Explained

Breaking down Old Rochester’s athletic complex overhaul

By Andrea Ray | Aug 24, 2017

Courtesy of: T.U.R.F.A rendering of T.U.R.F.’s plans to overhaul Old Rochester Regional High School’s athletic fields.

MATTAPOISET — Marion, Mattapoisett, and Rochester Town Meeting voters will be asked this year to approve a $1.67 million per-town cost for overhauling Old Rochester Regional High School’s athletic complex.

T.U.R.F. (Tri-Town Unified Recreation Facilities, Inc.) unveiled a $5 million overhaul of the current athletic complex in April of 2017. The project includes a new track, two synthetic fields where the current fields are, and two new natural grass fields, a new athletic building with a concession stand, storage and bathrooms.

The $1.67 million price tag per town could decrease by the time the project goes to a vote, however, as the nonprofit is working to raise funds through private donations.

The stadium field will cost $1.7 million, while the track and secondary field will cost $2.1 million. Both fields would be converted to synthetic turf, while the remaining fields would be irrigated and reseeded. The two new fields, the baseball field and the softball field at the front of the school will cost an estimated $285,000.

The total cost for the new athletic building is projected at $395,000.

At a public meeting on August 17, T.U.R.F. members answered questions about the project. Here’s a recap of the discussion.

 

1. How did the fields fall into such disrepair in the first place?

“It’s not a blame game,” Flynn said. “The real issue is that with all of the school and youth sports played on the fields, they get 900 hours of use per year. Natural grass maxes out at 600 hours per year. It can’t survive the current need that we have.”

He added that there are very few other playing fields within the tri-towns, leading to the majority of sports being played at the school fields, whether as a school sport or not.

2.Why not just plant more grass seed?

“We’ve heard this question before,” said T.U.R.F. Secretary Shaun Walsh. “The honest answer is, doing that is a money pit. You can plant as much grass seed as you like — it can’t cover the fact that we’ve gone far over the maximum number of hours that the grass can handle.”

3. Why does the track need to be replaced as well?

According to T.U.R.F member Hal Rood, the track is reaching the end of its useful life. Due to its impending demise, as well as the fact that it isn’t an eight-lane track approved for state events, he explained that it made sense to lump it into the project as well.

“We can’t host state events like finals here without a state-approved track,” he said.

4. Why use artificial turf, instead of natural grass?

“I like natural grass,” Rood conceded. “When I first joined T.U.R.F., I was pushing for natural grass fields. That just isn’t possible with the current use rates.”

He pointed out that synthetic turf fields can handle many more hours of use per year than natural grass fields. “The honest truth is that, with our current use rates, we would need to put in six natural grass fields to gain the same amount of hours that only two artificial turf fields can handle.”

A natural grass field can handle about 600 hours of use per year, or about 200 events and practices. Synthetic turf, on the other hand, can be used for over 1,500 hours per year, or over 500 events or practices per year.

5. Will the athletic complex overhaul bring in revenue? From where?

According to T.U.R.F, yes — Flynn said that $3,000,00 over 15 years is a conservative estimate. The numbers average out at about $200,000 in revenue per year. He noted that the estimates had been gauged by comparable prices charged by places like Tabor Academy and Taunton High School.

“Right now, we can’t host finals or playoffs,” he said. “Every time you go to one and fork over $5, guess where that money is going? To the hosting school. This is a chance for ORR to be the hosting school.”

Rood said that there were any number of teams who’d like to use the fields. “We have a flurry of youth and amateur leagues popping up,” he said. “Plus the number of outside leagues who would want to use the facility for games.”

He added that he hadn’t talked to a large number of leagues yet, but of the ones he had spoken to, most had been highly interested in the possibility of T.U.R.F.’s proposal. Global Premier Soccer, which according to Rood is one of the larger Massachusetts soccer leagues, was a key supporter. “They told me it was a no-brainer – they’d absolutely use the fields,” he said.

6. Where would the generated revenue go?

The ultimate direction of the generated revenue has yet to be decided. “It’s part of the selectmen’s decision when they consider this project,” Rood said, “and that will be part of their decision.”

There are three options: put the generated revenue towards the debt incurred by building the compled, holding the money in reserve, or holding the money to finance field replacement. According to Rood, the average lifespan of an appropriately-used turf field is 15 years.

7. Why not scale the project back to make it more affordable?

Use rates, said Rood. “If we only put in one synthetic turf field, we still aren’t able to host state and outside events, because there won’t be enough room or time. So the revenue generation would at least be cut in half, and we wouldn’t end up saving much.”

With two synthetic turf fields, one of the natural grass fields can be rested every season — the rest should ensure that the field is used sparingly enough to avoid deterioration.

8. What are some of the benefits for athletes on the fields?

“I’ve seen too many torn ACL ligaments,” said Rood. “The ground is so compressed and so dangerous to play on that hitting the body, or especially the head, against it could cause real damage. There should be some cushion there.”

Old Rochester teacher Lauren O’Brien (also a field hockey coach) noted that some college sports teams won’t even consider looking at a player who has only played on natural grass. A college field hockey player herself, she explained that playing on the two different surfaces was like night and day.

“Because most colleges wouldn’t even look at my tape on natural grass, I had to go join a club league to make them look at me,” she said. “I didn’t even really want to do that,  but I had no choice if I wanted to get on the team.”

9. Are there other benefits of building a new sports complex and fields?

The answer is yes, according to Rood. “I’ve spoken to the United States Realtors Association, and they’ve unequivocally told me that house values would rise as a result of this project being constructed.”

10. What happens if this project is denied by voters at Town Meeting?

According to Rood, the field is in bad enough shape that playing could shortly be suspended on it anyway. “At any moment, an official could walk onto these fields and declare them unsafe for players,” he said. “Then nothing can be played there until everything is approved by the officials again. Thetting on them sooner, rather than later, for the good of the kids playing on those fields.”

at means at some point, something is going to have to happen. The repairs are needed,” he continued. “We should be g
Visit www.boldmovesrealestate.com for more local news and a great team of local realtors ready to help you with your real estate needs.